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To ensure you are able to make a high amount of sales it is important that you know exactly who your customer is and how they make the decision to purchase.
 
It is sometimes the case that the consumer is a different person to the one making the purchase decision.  
 

Cases where the consumer and customer are different people: 

    The procurement department may be the decision maker for buying accounting software for the accounting department
 
•    A mother or parents will be the decision makers when purchasing nappies for the consumer – their new born, or choosing a smart phone with a particular contract tariff for their teenager children.
 
•    A husband will be the decision maker for buying a piece of jewellery for the consumer – his wife.
 
You might not realise right away that your customers are different to the people who actually consume your product.
 
It is however these consumers who will influence the customers to make repeat sales.
 
An example of this can be seen here, a female consumer is expressing her desire through a social photo sharing website Pinterest, whilst the decision maker and customer is actually her boyfriend.
 
 It is worth investing the extra time in researching and identifying exactly who is the decision maker.
 
Once you know who the decision maker is ensure you take factors into consideration such as what do they look for in a particular purchase, what will be the purposes of the product/services (there could be more than one) and when they like to buy the service or product, what are their buying patterns? 
 
More details on the consumers decision-making process can be seen here: understanding the decision making process of the consumer 
 

Resources

•    Case Study – Pampers knows how to attract mums 
•    Pareto principle explained
•    80/20 Rule applied to business and life